Oregon State Taxes – How To Get Online Tax Tips

http://oregonbusinessreport.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/taxes.jpgNowadays, information of different kinds are gathered from the internet like Oregon State taxes, you can look it up under their official website. But we save you the time instead and summarized the things that you have to know on Oregon State taxes.

Like other states, there are are different tax rates. For married individuals filing jointly, qualifying widow/widower as well as head of the family, although the same, the bracket would be doubled.

Another kind of tax under Oregon State taxes is the Confidential Personal Property Return should be filed by any one owning a business. This is filed through the city or country assessor in where the business is located. The U.S. City Average Consumer Price Index is where the assessors base the indexing of a property if the value of the property assessed is proved to be below $12,500 in value.

How to Know if a Tax Preparer is Qualified

there are three types of tax preparers:  The competent, the incompetent and the unscrupulous.  The reason?  Except for California, New York and Oregon there are no standardized requirements for paid tax preparers.In California, tax preparers who are not a licensed attorney, certified public accountant (CPA) or IRS enrolled agent (EA), are required by law to register with the California Tax Education Council (CTEC).  All CTEC-registered tax preparers (CRTPs) must complete tax education courses each year and obtain a surety bond before they can prepare tax returns for a fee.

In Oregon, tax preparers must be licensed through the Oregon State Board of Tax Practitioners.  Oregon tax preparers are required to pass a competency exam before they can prepare tax returns professionally.In 2009, New York passed legislation to mandate that its tax preparers register with the state; however, proof of education on tax laws is not required.  Maryland is also working to implement legislation it passed in 2008 to require state licenses for tax preparers.Consumers in other states should be extremely careful when choosing a tax preparer.

there is no oversight for tax preparers who are not an attorney, CPA or EA, which means the training, education and ethical standards these tax preparers go by are set at their own discretion.Requiring tax preparer oversight on a national scale is an issue the IRS says needs to be addressed. On January 4, 2010, the IRS issued a proposal to set new registration, testing and continuing education requirements for paid tax preparers who are not an attorney, CPA or EA.Hiring the wrong tax preparer could result in penalties, missed deductions and no protection against mistakes or fraud.  In the eyes of the IRS, it is the taxpayer, not the tax preparer, who is responsible for the information listed on the tax return, no matter if the information is accurate or fraudulent

RS Pursues Tax Preparer Regulation

The Internal Revenue Service wants to set new rules on income tax preparers nationwide. IRS Commissioner Doug Shulman issued a proposal on January 4, 2010 citing federal regulation will help reduce fraud, improve compliance and close the tax gap.California and Oregon are the only states that have set tax education requirements for its income tax preparers. In 2009, New York passed legislation to require its tax preparers register with the state; however, it does not enforce education or insurance requirements.In California, paid income tax preparers who are not a licensed attorney, certified public accountant (CPA) or IRS enrolled agent (EA), are required by law to register with the California Tax Education Council (CTEC).
All CTEC-registered tax preparers (CRTPs) must complete tax education courses each year and obtain a surety bond before they can prepare tax returns for a fee.In Oregon, all paid tax preparers must be licensed through the Oregon State Board of Tax Practitioners. Oregon tax preparers have to pass a competency exam before they can prepare tax returns professionally.“Compliance is a big issue with tax pros,” said Mary Beth LaMunyon-Jones, CRTP and CTEC board member. “Nationwide there are the good ones and the bad ones. There are the ones who care and the ones who don’t.”Proponents of the IRS proposal believe enforcing tax education and professional licenses for tax preparers is a necessary step in order to increase the protection of taxpayers.
Skeptics argue it is not tax preparers who are entirely to blame, but the complex tax code that is causing issues and mistakes.“From CTEC’s standpoint, the reasoning has always been that some education is better than no education,” said Celeste Heritage, CTEC administrator.Federal regulation of tax preparers has been a topic of discussion for at least five years. The question of how to fund a national tax preparer program has been one of the biggest hurdles for the IRS and even some states that want regulation. Maryland passed legislation in 2008 to license its tax preparers; however, the program has been postponed due to budget constraints.